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Monday, March 31, 2014

Garden Share- April



I am joining in again with a group of gardeners from far and wide to share what's going on in our gardens in April. It is also a bit of a wrap of  what has been happening in March too. The Garden Share Collective is hosted by Lizzie and if you have a  moment or two then it is well worth a looksee.

By the looks of things, April is going to be a green month. We have had some decent rain during March, 83mm all up and most of that last week. It has been so refreshing for the soil and for the soul. The temperatures have been warm some days and quite cool others. Typical for this changeover time of the year. Maximum for March was 35.3degC and the minimum was 9.4degC both recorded on my veranda which is sheltered so garden temperatures would be both hotter and colder.

The temperatures must be just about right though because all of the summer vegetables are having an autumn flush and refusing to give up their spots in the patch.
 
 

I thought instead of showing the usual vegetable/ fruit/ herb garden pictures I would share some things that don't usually make it onto the blog. The front garden for example. Right now it could do with a good weed and a tidy up. It is looking a bit boring because it is just green, not many flowers to break up the monochrome.

Correa Dusky Bells

Correa alba
 In my native garden the Correas are in bloom. They are sweet. I thought the white one was a little drab but once I looked at the picture, I could see how lovely it actually is with its symmetry. I think I'll try to find a few other varieties to plant. They are low/ no maintenance and can be popped into small spaces that need something.

Planting:
  • peas
  • snow peas
  • broad beans
  • turnip
  • radish
  • kohl rabi
  • lettuces
  • tatsoi
  • kale
  • mustard
  • brassicas
And probably a few other things but I'm working off memory.

Harvesting:
  • limes
  • finger limes
  • herbs
  • leaves
  • tomatoes
  • corn
  • zucchini
  • capsicum
  • chillies
  • beans
  • the odd strawberry
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • radish


Some of the recent rain came in via a mighty storm with wind and lightning and small hail. The wisteria didn't take too kindly to it and working out what to do with it is a job for April. Last month it was the jasmine that needed to be righted. I'm not sure this job will be as easy.

Sugarcane

I don't think I've shared a picture of my sugarcane as yet. Well, here it is. I've gone so far against the trend of giving up sugar that I'm growing it in my backyard. Not that I will actually get any actual sugar from it. I just wanted to have a bit of fun and grow something different.

Things to do in April
  • plant some lavenders
  • fix up the wisteria
  • mow the grass
  • turn the compost
  • keep weeding
  • pull out spent summer plants as necessary
  • grow some microgreens and sprouts
  • have fun
Tracy

5 comments:

Sunnybrook Farm said...

Looks like you are going to have a productive fall if the weather doesn't blow again.

africanaussie said...

Everything looks lovely and green in your garden Tracy. I think wisteria is quite a heavy plant, hope you get some help with fixing up its support. Glad to see you are also going to be growing some sprouts and microgreens, I am loving doing that. It seems to extend the growing season.

endah murniyati said...

All look green and fresh. Your plan for April sounds so interesting, especially planting the lavender. Something that really difficult for me.

thenewgoodlife said...

I love correas, subtle but beautiful and great for attracting small native birds and insects. I created a biodiversity garden with some kids at the school I used to teach at and we had lots or correas in there.

Sugar cane sounds like a fun experiment - I too am moving against the no-sugar trend. perhaps you could harvest the canes and chew on them like kids in Asia do for a treat.

liz @ Strayed Table said...

You are growing your own sugar! Insane - I love it! I don't think I have the patience to grow it and then turn it magically into sugar. After my mung bean experiment it was still cheaper to buy it by a long shot. Mind you it might be better for you if you do it yourself. Glad you also got some rains. Thanks for the reminder to get my snowpeas in.